Sunday, March 01, 2015

Popology: The Music of the Era in the Lives of Four Icons of the 1960s by Timothy English

Full disclosure: The publisher sent me a free copy of Popology because I reviewed a previous title by the author.

In Popology, English writes about the musical tastes of John F. Kennedy; Martin Luther King, Jr., Robert F. Kennedy; and Thomas Merton. This is a great time for a book like this. Had it been written 20 years ago, we wouldn't be able to follow along by listening to these songs on the Internet.

The first chapter about JFK gets the book off to a slow start. He grew up with "American Songbook" tunes, so I couldn't relate. This chapter also exposes the book's biggest flaw: sloppy typographical errors. Composer Richard Rodgers, famous for co-writing songs for Broadway musicals with Lorenz Hart and Oscar Hammerstein II, suffers the indignity of having his last name spelled three different ways!

The Martin Luther King, Jr. chapter is a little more interesting, getting into what most people consider "the music of the 1960s" (the era beginning with the Beatles' arrival in America a few months after JFK's assassination). I was not aware of Harry Belafonte's financial and strategic contributions to the civil rights movement, nor did I know that his Calypso was the first million-selling LP by an individual singer.

My favorite chapter, both musically and biographically, is about Bobby Kennedy. I didn't know a lot about him before, and now I can better understand how devastating his assassination was to many Americans.

I had never heard of Thomas Merton. Even my mom hadn't, and I would expect her to know a prominent 1960s Catholic. Frankly, Merton's inclusion seems a bit forced by the author. His story is interesting and includes 1960s music, but his fame and impact are not on the level of the Kennedys and MLK.

Overall, Popology is new way of looking at the music of the 1960s, and as such is a worthwhile read.

4 stars

No comments: