Saturday, July 19, 2014

2014 Books Part X

F My Life World Tour: Life's Crappiest Moments from Around the Globe by Maxime Valette, Guillaume Passaglia, and Didier Guedj - This book is funny, but not as funny as the first volume. I was disappointed that entries are so similar across countries, which kind of renders the premise pointless. 3 stars

How to Be Pope: What to Do and Where to Go Once You're in the Vatican by Piers Marchant - A book like this could go wrong in many ways, but Marchant manages to be informative, funny, and yet respectful. I had no idea there is a popular gas station next to St. Peter's Basilica. 4 stars

The Heartless Stone: A Journey Through the World of Diamonds, Deceit, and Desire by Tom Zoellner - I enjoyed Zoellner's book about uranium, and he employs a similar approach here. After a broken engagement, he travels around the world (12 countries on six continents) to learn about the diamond trade past and present from prospecting and mining to marketing and selling. 5 stars

The Big Rewind: A Memoir Brought to You by Pop Culture by Nathan Rabin - This is a funny book, as one would expect from an Onion A.V. Club writer, but many of the stories just aren't very interesting. Rabin devotes too many pages to the TV show he appeared on for a few months, and the paperback bonus chapter is forgettable if not downright regrettable (when a blogger thinks you are over-sharing, you've gone too far). The earlier chapters about growing up in a group home in Chicago are better, though. I also expected more pop culture references based on the subtitle. Ultimately, The Big Rewind is mildly entertaining but disappointing. 3 stars


     

Monday, July 14, 2014

2014 Books Part IX

Interstate 69: The Unfinished History of the Last Great American Highway by Matt Dellinger - For decades, Interstate 69 was a short highway through northern Indiana and southern Michigan. But in the early 1990s, various highway boosters banded together to envision the "NAFTA Superhighway" from border to border via Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, and Michigan. Dellinger gives an excellent, background-rich account of the controversial genesis of an interstate in the modern political landscape. 5 stars

God Save the Fan: How Preening Sportscasters, Athletes Who Speak in the Third Person, and the Occasional Convicted Quarterback Have Taken the Fun Out of Sports (And How We Can Get It Back) by Will Leitch - As one would expect from the editor of Deadspin, this book pokes fun at people in the sports world. The parenthetical subtitle overreaches, though—a couple pages at the end say we can get it back with blogs, or something weak like that. Since I don't watch ESPN and don't follow sports other than NFL football, a lot of jokes went over my head but I enjoyed it regardless. 4 stars

All Madden: Hey, I'm Talking Pro Football by John Madden - I always enjoyed the way Madden saw and explained football as a sportscaster. Whenever I see one of his old books cheap, I buy it. Though no longer timely, his books are still fun to read. 4 stars

People Like Us: Misrepresenting the Middle East by Joris Luyendijk - This is the second book I've read translated from Dutch in the past two years. Luyendijk illuminates the world of foreign correspondents: it's not about finding stories so much as covering the ones your editor pulls from the wire service. He describes the particular trials of working in the Middle East's dictatorships, where visas and information are hard to acquire. Along the way, he shows that the people of the region and the realities of the situations there are not necessarily what we see on television. 5 stars


     

Saturday, July 12, 2014

2014 Books Part VIII

Everyone Loves You When You're Dead by Neil Strauss - This is an interesting collection of interview excerpts, mostly from musicians. Generally it's more about the absurd world of celebrity rather than the art these people have created. Strauss should have included dates to provide context, but I think he intended for this book to be a jumbled mess of some sort. I enjoyed it in spite of its nutty structure, which cost it a star. 4 stars

The Devil and the Disappearing Sea: Or, How I Tried to Stop the World's Worst Ecological Catastrophe by Rob Ferguson - This book combines two of my interests, water and Central Asia, but it's mostly a post-Soviet bureaucratic nightmare. Working with an NGO in 1999, Ferguson attempted to raise public awareness about the Aral Sea's destruction with disappointing results. It's a crazy and entertaining tale, but I was hoping for more about the Aral Sea itself. 4 stars

Garbology: Our Dirty Love Affair with Trash by Edward Humes - Garbage is much more interesting than one might expect. Humes looks at the mess (sorry) we've made, what we can learn from it (including landfill archaeology!), and what we can do about it. I suppose the author is a little biased, but how could anyone other than Oscar the Grouch not be biased against garbage? 4 stars

I Don't Care About Your Band: What I Learned from Indie Rockers, Trust Funders, Pornographers, Felons, Faux-Sensitive Hipsters, and Other Guys I've Dated by Julie Klausner - As a middle-aged dude, I am not the target audience for this book. I think I bought it because I read a page or two and thought it was funny. I guess I should have read more before adding it to my stack (in my defense, this was during the Borders bankruptcy sale, and I had a lot of ground to cover in a short time). As yet another young-woman-dating-in-NYC memoir (ugh), it isn't particularly memorable, but I'll give it some points for being funny. 2 stars


      

Wednesday, July 02, 2014

2014 Books Part VII

Silk Road to Ruin: Is Central Asia the New Middle East? by Ted Rall - Central Asia, aka "the 'Stans" (Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, et al), is a corner of the world that interests me. Rall's book is funny and informative. My wife loved it, too, but for some reason she asked if we should visit these countries. I told her I read stuff like this to convince myself not to go there. 4 stars

The Story of Astronomy: From Babylonian Stargazers to the Search for the Big Bang by Peter Aughton - Purchasing and reading this book was inspired by watching Cosmos. Though I knew a fair amount about the history of astronomy already, I still found this book useful. It is well-written and easy for the layperson to understand. 5 stars

The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism by Geoff Nicholson - This book is best when delivering on its subtitle, but the author's own experiences are less interesting. I find this excerpt fascinating:
Of the 70,000 or so pedestrians who are injured by cars in America every year, 15,000 of them are New Yorkers, a staggering proportion. With 2.7 percent of the nation's population the city has 21 percent of the injuries. Nearly three-quarters of these occur on crosswalks, and quite a few of them occur when the pedestrian is actually on the sidewalk... Drunken driving accounts for just a few percent of pedestrian deaths, but in 1998 one-third of pedestrians killed by a motor vehicle were legally drunk.
That makes me reconsider the times I've walked around Chicago with a good buzz on. 3 stars

DVRT The Ultimate Sandbag Training System: For Dynamic Power, Superior Athletic Performance and Enduring Strength by Josh Henkin - This is the book for sandbag training. I've read a lot that Henkin has written over the years online and in his not-so-good first book, but I am surprised how much additional info he packs into this one. Like other books published by Dragon Door, this isn't cheap but it's high-quality and worth the price (Kindle edition is much cheaper). If you want functional, "real-world" strength, buy this book and a sandbag or two (and use them, of course!). It really works. 5 stars